Fab Fridays 55: Our Education System

"Every year, we churn out millions of workers who are trained to do 1925-style labor." — Seth Godin

Here’s how some industries have changed in the last ~100 years...

The last image will blow your mind.

1. TELECOMMUNICATIONS

2. COMPUTING

3. AGRICULTURE

4. CONSTRUCTION

5. GROUND TRANSPORTATION

6. AEROSPACE

7. MUSIC

8. TELEVISION

9. EDUCATION

Our education system is obsolete.

It’s outdated. It’s outrageous. It’s broken.

It was designed for a very different time and purpose: In the 18th and 19th century, when the goal was not to produce innovative thinkers but rather factory workers and soldiers.

And it worked! This system lifted us out of the dark ages and allowed the Industrial age to occur. We had several generations of productive, fully employed workers.

But as the world changed and the workplace changed with it, the school system hasn’t evolved.

Traditional schools remain focused on preparing kids for jobs that no longer exist.

"Every year, we churn out millions of workers who are trained to do 1925-style labor." — Seth Godin

They continue to enforce and prioritize compliance, metrics, and consumption over creativityproblem solving, and entrepreneurship.

“If you do a job where someone tells you exactly what to do, he will find someone cheaper than you to do it. And yet our schools are churning out kids who are stuck looking for jobs where the boss tells them exactly what to do.” — Seth Godin

Our new world demands citizens who are self-learners, creative, and resourceful. Problem solvers who can adjust and adapt to constant change. Independent thinkers willing to carve their own paths.

The good news? New and bold alternatives are already being tested out there. Check out SynthesisActon AcademySora SchoolsGalileo, and Prisma.

The challenge is not to improve on what we've done before—it’s not about doing the old thing a little better. It’s about building something new and different. Not fixing, or reforming, or changing, but transforming.

P.S. If you are interested in learning more about the origins of our education system, check out John Taylor Gatto's books. I distill some of his ideas in this past newsletter.

Until next week!

Ana Lorena Fabrega